I’m burning the candle at both ends lately but it’s worth it when I’m getting in some good reading…

Hunger Games Trilogy by Suzanne Collins. I tried to keep my expectations low going into this series, because I hate being disappointed by over-hyped books. And I’m not usually into YA fiction – never got into Harry Potter and never read Twilight. But for me, these books lived up to the hype. The characters were great, the plots and concepts were complex and thought provoking, the writing was good. Without giving away any spoilers, I think the ending of the trilogy left some things to desired, but wasn’t bad enough to ruin the overall experience for me. I loved reading a teenage heroine who wasn’t a romantic figure – so many elements of the books defied my expectations, in a good way. So if you are one of the 10 people on Earth who haven’t read this uber-popular trilogy yet, give it a whirl.

*a side note on ebooks* I love books. Actual books. In college my graduating thesis was a series of handmade books, so it should come as no surprise that I’m not on the ereader bandwagon. However, in the interest of meeting a book club deadline, I borrowed the second two Hunger Games books, for free, via Amazon from a friend in the group and read them on my phone with the free Kindle app. I have to admit it was kind of amazing – I didn’t even know my phone could do that, and for free! And the instant gratification! But it didn’t convert me. I still love books more, and the un-physicality of the ebooks was weird for me – even though I could read that I was 84% of the way through a novel, I couldn’t see where I was in the book. And I think even more than that, it bothered me that my kid was seeing me glued to my phone all the time I was engrossed in this trilogy. I want him to see me reading books – I don’t feel like I am modeling a love of reading when I’m holding my smartphone. Moving on….

A Feast for Crows by George R.R. Martin. The fourth in the Game of Thrones series of novels, I was fairly close to the end of this one when I temporarily put it down to read Hunger Games in time for the book club discussion. The GoT book before this started off slow and ended up exciting, and I think this one was the opposite – I was really into it at first and then it just dwindled to nothing. I liked some of the new plot threads, like the religious cult that arises in the kingdom, but none of it really went anywhere. It started to feel like getting bogged down in the later seasons of Lost when you begin to doubt that you are being led to any kind of satisfying conclusion. Even so, after slogging through four books I’ll probably go on with the series.

The Boys of My Youth by Jo Ann Beard. This was a huuuge downshift from Hunger Games and even Feast for Crows. It was definitely the wrong time to read it, but I had requested it from the library earlier and that’s how the cookie crumbled. It was difficult for me to get fully into the mood of this slow, lush, beautiful book – in fact I’ll probably come back to it another time – but I would highly recommend it and thank Kristine for the heads up. A collection of short nonfiction pieces, it reads more like a fine art painting than a memoir… prepare yourself to slow down and sink in.

Happy Chaos by Soleil Moon Frye. I loved Punky Brewster as a kid. I wanted to BE her. In fact the highest compliment you could have paid me when I was 8 years old was to tell me I looked like Punky. So of course I had to pick up this memoir slash parenting book by Soleil Moon Frye… and it didn’t disappoint – not for this Punky fan. It’s fun and light and entertaining, kind of like a print version of a personal blog written by a mom who is happy to admit she doesn’t have everything figured out and oh by the way also has lots of stories about growing up as Punky Brewster!! I was worried I might hate her because she seems so crunchy and beautiful and perfect, but she is actually endearingly humble and sunny – I like that in a person.

Broken Irish by Edward J. Delaney. Totally random pick at the library, one of my MUST FIND A BOOK BEFORE TODDLER DESTRUCTION ENSUES grabs from the new release shelf. A novel set in South Boston in 1999, it follows the rapidly crumbling lives of a few different Southie residents. I love a Boston setting, even though I’m not personally too familiar with Southie, and I thought the place and people were wonderfully drawn in this book. It deals with some themes that could have been trite, namely Catholic priest sex abuse, but was never maudlin or cliched. I was really digging this book the whole way through and looked forward to every naptime and bedtime when I could squeeze in a few chapters, and then – the ending. I’m not against the open, ambiguous ending in a few really well executed cases, but for the most part they just annoy me. I don’t understand why novelists go to all the trouble of crafting a story that draws you in, builds momentum, propels you and all the characters to some looming climax and then – PEACE OUT. Booooo! There was a bit of a “reveal” at the end but it wasn’t enough to be a good conclusion. Just based on that one flaw, I can only recommend this if you are willing to be emotionally invested in a story that just kind of flakes out on you at the end.

Maisie Dobbs by Jacqueline Winspear. Thank you to Dunc for this recommendation when I tweeted my despair over Hunger Games being such a hard act to follow. I just started it, so no review yet, but I’ll be coming back to it with the next installment of What Are You Reading?!

Advertisements