OCD

I’ve been reading a lot of YA novels lately as part of my research for writing my own YA novel (which I’ve actually started! About 1,000 words so far). I think we have JK Rowling to thank for giving children’s and YA literature a measure of respectability as adult reading fare (I believe that we never would have had the Hunger Games phenomenon without Harry Potty – agree/disagree?). Right now there is a lot of good stuff being published in the YA genre. This label does not mean the book is easy or lightweight, but simply that it is has an adolescent main character driving the story. Here are some YA novels I’ve read lately.

* City of Heavenly Fire by Cassandra Clare. The sixth and final book in the Mortal Instruments series felt more like homework than pleasure reading. The MI series follows main character Clary, who is a Shadowhunter – a race of humans descended from angels who defend the world from demons – and her love interest Jace. Other characters include vampires, werewolves, and fairies, but this is more of an adventure series than a Twilight-esque romance. It started out pretty entertaining but by this final book the plot felt really tortured and the love affair between Clary and Jace was stale. Clare injected a whole new set of characters that was obviously a segue into a new Shadowhunter series, but it felt forced and it annoyed me that she was trying to hook me into her next book. I’ll pass.

* Everything Leads to You by Nina LaCour. This was a novel I picked up rather haphazardly in the library YA section and I didn’t expect much from it. At the outset, the LA setting and movie-biz characters didn’t appeal, but the narrator quickly grew on me. Emi is a high school girl who reads more like a college kid (maybe she should have been? does YA include college kids?), a film studio intern, and she’s coming off of an unhealthy on-again off-again relationship with an older woman when she falls in love with a mysterious girl from a broken home who just happens to be the long lost granddaughter of a Hollywood star (Clint Eastwood thinly disguised I think). Okay, this sounds terrible when I describe it. But it was pretty sweet and charming.

* OCD Love Story by Corey Ann Haydu. Haydu’s new book Life By Committee was highly recommended by my blogger friend Christina, but since my library doesn’t have that one yet, I tried this earlier novel by the author. And. Wow. OCD Love Story is intense. It’s narrated in the first person by a teenaged girl named Bea and as I read I felt I was inside her tortured mind as she spirals downward. As the book begins she has fairly recently developed symptoms of OCD and throughout the story her obsessions and compulsions escalate until they have completely overtaken her life. Meanwhile, the love story aspect involves a boy in her therapy group who is also struggling with OCD. I think this would be a difficult read for someone who is dealing with real life anxiety disorder, but it was incredibly well written and gripping. Recommended IF you are up for riding along on a teenaged girl’s journey through mental illness.

* Stop Me If You’ve Heard This One Before by David Yoo. Here is where I confess to you that I have a bias against male authors. I know it’s terrible, but it’s true. When I’m browsing for books, I usually scan for female authors – I’ve found that this goes double when I am looking for YA – in spite of the fact that I LOVE plenty of male novelists. So anyway, I picked this one up. At first I absolutely hated the voice of Albert, the nerdy teenaged narrator – I found it implausibly jokey and contrived. I didn’t believe in some of the characters (notably, his parents). But as the story wore on and I realized that Albert was an unreliable narrator, was supposed to be untrustworthy and shtick-y and hopelessly dorky, the book clicked for me. I still had trouble rooting for Al to get the girl, because he was so needy and smothering (THAT part did seem realistic, for a teenaged boy!), but it didn’t seem to matter whether I rooted for him or not, it was enjoyable to love/hate him and I liked that this book felt truly unique.

* Fangirl by Rainbow Rowell. I saved the best one for last, even though this was the first YA novel I read in this batch of books. In fact, this was the book that made me want to both write a YA novel and to read more of them – a lot more. I haven’t read Rowell’s adult-audience books yet, but I have read her other YA novel Eleanor & Park. What I love about Rowell is that she beautifully captures the emotional richness of adolescence, the way that time in a person’s life just feels so enormous and momentous – but is also ordinary and small. Eleanor & Park was a sweet love story that made me ugly-cry out loud, but I fell in love with Fangirl. The story is simple – Cath and her twin sister Wren go off to college, navigate separating from each other and from their dad, Cath struggles with balancing schoolwork with her passion for writing fanfic, and there is a love story. It’s really the way Rainbow Rowell writes Cath’s endearing and unforgettable character – I feel like she must love her at least as much as her readers do – that breathes life into this story. Especially if you happen to have ever been a college freshman, a young woman, a writer, and a book lover, this book is simply irresistible.

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