What Are You Reading? YA Edition

Books

Why We Broke Up by Daniel Handler. Best known for his Lemony Snicket children’s books, Handler here is writing as a female first person narrator for a YA audience. The device, or perhaps gimmick, of the tale is that Min is sorting through a box of mementos from her relationship with ex-boyfriend Ed, while composing a letter to him about, of course, why they broke up. Each item begins a new chapter that triggers a memory, and each of these chapter begins with a painting of said item. I actually found these illustrations to be the weakest part of the book and I frequently wished they weren’t there – which maybe is a case of me being too “trained” in illustration, because I was taught that an illustration should always add something to the text and not simply depict what’s written in a literal way. I kept looking for them to add some other clue or layer of meaning to the story, but they were just pictures of objects and by the end I felt they kind of cheapened the writing. My other complaint was that I sometimes found the dialogue a bit too witty to be believed. But what won me over is that this story painted a wonderfully, awkwardly, painfully accurate picture of what being a teenager is like in matters of love. All the misunderstandings, casual hurts, and intoxicating hopefulness of teen love were there, and that’s why I liked this book.

Blood Red Road by Moira Young. An adventure story set in a post-apocalyptic future, this is the first book in a trilogy about a gritty teenage heroine named Saba. The setting is a kind of sci-fi tinged wild west, and the book is written in a twangy dialect that took me some time to get used to – in fact, for a while I wasn’t sure I was going to. But as the action picked up, the dialect writing faded to where I could just hear it as Saba’s voice. With a futuristic dystopian backdrop and a bow and arrow slinging heroine, it’s obvious why this might be compared with Hunger Games, but I found its world to be more intriguingly complex, its storyline more epic, its love story sexier and more appealing. Though it started off slow for me, as soon as I finished reading the last sentence of Blood Red Road I jumped on my public library app and reserved the sequel.

Sekret by Lindsay Smith. This book came highly recommended by my friend Christina of Allodoxophobia and the premise drew me right in: Sekret takes place in Soviet Russia in the 1960s and involves a group of teenage psychics being trained by the KGB as spies. I have to point out that this novel is a perfect example of why the YA genre really should be taken seriously by adult readers – far from being a churned out slew of Twilight copycats, it’s full of inventive and original storytelling. I did have a hard time with the long descriptive passages in the book, but I’m not sure if I was just not in the right frame of mind to focus on them, or if the setting of Soviet Russia was just too foreign to envision. But overall I thought the concept, story, and characters were compelling and unique, and this was a thriller that kept me guessing at every turn.

Rebel Heart by Moira Young. In the second book of Young’s Dust Lands trilogy, the dialect writing was instantly invisible to me, which was nice. It hard to review book two without spoiling book one – well, without spoilers in general, I guess – but it seems to me that the middle work of a trilogy either is a total knockout that takes advantage of its relative freedom (it doesn’t have to set things up nor wrap them up) to be bold and creative (see Star Wars) or it’s a kind of plodding bridge trying to get from point A to point B (see Catching Fire). This, unfortunately, seemed like the latter. There were some good new characters and a KERRR-AAAAZY plot twist (!!!! that better go somewhere good!) but over all it fell a little flat for me.

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