Infodumping is My Love Language vol. 3

Infodumping

Infodumping* “With writing, though, none of this applies. I’m so free. This whole post, for example, would have been very hard to convey if I had to ‘tell’ it to you aloud. When my fingers are on a keyboard, or screen, or writing utensil, the real me emerges so readily. I’m free. Not that the ‘me’ that is there when I’m in person isn’t real; it is. But just less certain, less meaningfully communicative, less…me. Kind of like a person speaking a foreign language. You can live in a country for 20 years and the language of that land is now very familiar to you. You now speak that language quite well, but it will never come with the ease and natural comfort of your native tongue. In your second language you might be ‘good,’ but in your native tongue you are almost ‘great.'” – Why I Don’t Like All Those ‘Get Off Social Media and Into the Real World’ Posts, at Just Being Me… Who Needs ‘Normalcy’ Anyway?

Emma: I believe this is a picture of that subtle, female emotion called “mascara.” Melanie: “If I blink, I might die.” Actual Test Answer: “Desire” – The ‘Reading the Mind in the Eyes’ Test: A Collaborative Critique, at Lemon Peel.

* “But as we see in the last scene, more and more of Riley’s memories are colored by two emotions at a time. That got us wondering what the many blends of Riley’s five core emotions might look like. What happens when fear is combined with disgust? Or when anger is combined with joy? Here’s our best guess, in graphic form from Christophe Haubursin.” – Chart: How Inside Out’s 5 Emotions Work Together to Make More Feelings, at Vox Culture.

* “It turns out that unexpected things drain my spoons via a slow-drip leak. The sound of hammering all day as my neighbor’s house is getting a new roof? Sensory spoon leakage. Sitting in one position for too long? Physical activity and sensory spoon leakage. Listening to a radio program while I work? Language spoon leakage. Cursing out the bank’s confusing phone menu? Executive function spoon leakage.” – Conserving Spoons, at Musings of an Aspie.

* “Another Nobel-winning economist, Amartya Sen, posits that political repression impedes economic growth — that prosperity requires that social and economic well-being be tethered to democratic values. Escuela Nueva turns the schoolhouse into a laboratory for democracy. Rather than being run as a mini-dictatorship, with the principal as its unquestioned leader, the school operates as a self-governing community, where teachers, parents and students have a real say in how it is run. When teachers unfamiliar with this approach are assigned to these schools, it’s often the students themselves who teach them how to apply the method. ‘In these schools, citizenship isn’t abstract theory,’ Ms. Colbert told me. ‘It’s daily practice.'” – Make School a Democracy, by David L. Kirp at The New York Times.

Infodumping is My Love Language vol. 2

Infodumping, Parenting

Infodumping

 

Here’s some good stuff I read (or reread) this week:

* “When white people go on shooting sprees, their actions are frequently attributed to mental illness and, thus, they’re not considered fully accountable for the harm they’ve inflicted. But in a historical psychoanalysis of 235 mass murders in the U.S., forensic psychiatrist Dr. Michael Stone called this a logical fallacy, and noted the media narrative tends to go something like this: Someone committed mass murder, therefore he is mentally ill, which caused him to commit mass murder. This narrative — which is not afforded to people of color — feeds into the assumption that incidents like what happened at Emanuel AME Church are isolated tragedies executed by lone gunmen. Essentially, it excuses the system that allows racialized terrorism to keep happening.” – Racism Is Not a Mental Illness, by Julia Craven, at Huffington Post.

* “In naive moments, I like to think that racism is something that happened 50 years ago and a “card” that is played when somebody needs a way out. But, once you love a black man in America, there’s no way to deny the obvious, discrete and innate nature that people show with discrimination and hate.” – What It’s Like As a White Woman to Love a Black Man in America at Bows, Bottles, and a Briefcase.

* “In America, far too many of us live in strange bubbles where we hardly ever hear viewpoints that conflict with our own. And, if we hear them, we immediately discount them as lacking credibility. It’s likely that Roof lived in such a dangerous bubble where conservative lies about Gray and Martin caused him to think that these two young men not only got what they deserved, but also that people like them pose a real threat.” – Connecting the Dots: Charleston Shooter, Trayvon Martin, Freddie Gray, and the American Confederacy by Shaun King, at Daily Kos.

* “We also know the predictable pattern the stoplight creates.  Think about how it feels to see your name, day after day, moving towards that red circle, broadcast to your peers and anyone who walks into your classroom.  Those are the very children who struggle with “school behavior,” and they deserve our support, not embarrassment.” – A Letter to Teachers On The Use of Stoplights In The Classroom, at Beyond The Stoplight.

* “Instead of reassuring parents that vaccines don’t cause autism (which, again: factually true), why don’t we start refuting anti-vaccination advocates with the fact that autism isn’t a catastrophe. Why not start sending them links to blogs and articles written by people who actually have autism. Why not say something like, ‘it’s been proven that there’s no link between vaccines and autism, but I think it would be great for you to re-evaluate why you think so negatively of autism.'” – Vaccines Don’t Cause Autism, But That’s Not the Point. Stop Being Ableist, at the Belle Jar.

Infodumping Is My Love Language vol. 1

Infodumping

Infodumping

“Infodumping” is a term that is used in writerly circles (also called “exposition”) and also in reference to autism (also called “monologuing”) and means what it sounds like – unloading a whole bunch of information on someone at once. And I love it. I drew the cartoon above because I love when someone lets me go on and on about things I find interesting, and I also love when people share the things they are into with me. Unless it’s couponing. Sorry couponers. I don’t like couponing.

“Infodumping Is My Love Language” is, therefore, the running title of my new series of link lists. You would not believe how many articles I bookmark or pin in a week, resolve to share them later, but never get to it because I have already shared so many articles… I’ve got to put these things somewhere! Enjoy:

* “I think, because we’re adults and because we can, we should put a moratorium on apologizing for sharing information that we find interesting.” – An Open Invitation to Infodump, at Musings of an AspieWhat better place to start the series?

* “The social model of disability is a way of thinking about disability in which disability results not from an individual’s neurological, physical or mental characteristics but from barriers created by society. The social model distinguishes between impairment, which is when someone has an unusually low ability to do something, and disability, which is when someone is prevented from full participation in society on the basis of an impairment.” – Disabled Not Disordered: Autism and the Social Model, at Autism Through the Medium of Cats. A lovely explanation of the social model of disability.

* “Now studies have shown that in the standard U.S. school day at the average American public school, approximately one hour and fifteen minutes goes into actual instruction of new material. That’s right – 75 minutes. This is not as strange as it might initially sound. Consider what happens in a six-hour school day: movement from class-to-class and the required settling in and getting up, attendance-taking, pledge, bureaucratic busywork, lunch, recess, ‘physical education,’ drug-taking (both of the prescribed and illicit variety), sexual harassment. Inside the classroom, review of stuff from the day before, last week, or last year; homework assignments collection and distribution; dealing with ‘behavior problems’; classroom organization; tests, including review time for the statewide ones – you get the picture.” – Just Do the Math, by David Albert, at Best HomeschoolingNice and tidy demonstration of how efficiently kids can learn what they need to know without going to school.

* “What does it mean to hold space for someone else? It means that we are willing to walk alongside another person in whatever journey they’re on without judging them, making them feel inadequate, trying to fix them, or trying to impact the outcome. When we hold space for other people, we open our hearts, offer unconditional support, and let go of judgement and control.” – What It Means to “Hold Space” for People, Plus Eight Tips on How to Do It Well, at Heather PlettGreat advice on how to support someone who is going through difficult times.

* “How does Joe Autie feel about his achievement? ‘We’re very proud of him,’ said his mother.” – Person With Autism Manages to Do Something, at Illusion of Competence. This short satirical piece is three years old but makes me laugh so much I had to share.

* “It is true, we should pay attention to what is around us. We should listen when people are saying important things to us, and notice beautiful wildlife and sights we have not seen before, but we should also let our mind do its own thing when it wants to, not fight it. Let it wander and explore and come up with solutions. For those of us on the spectrum this is quality time to decompress from all that is present that we find overwhelming, to focus on ourselves and let lose our creativity.” – The Practice of Mindfulness: Why Is It So Stressful? at AspertypicalI really relate to this account of rejecting the modern trend of mindfulness, or as one friend puts it McMindfulness, in favor of letting your mind wander.